More and more, inflammation is proving to play a causal role in a surprising number of conditions.

Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) has proven to be of great value for a number of conditions. The evidence is especially strong for virtually any heart condition, but also for gingivitis, migraine and many other conditions. CoQ10 is well known for its role in energy production and for its role as an antioxidant. A new study suggests a novel and little discussed way CoQ10 may also be helping. . . .

In our book Sex & Fertility: Natural Solutions, we say that nuts and seeds are helpful for the male sexual system because they are high in zinc, essential fatty acids, fiber and other nutrients. The essential fatty acids, we say, are essential for normal glandular functioning and activity in the reproductive system.

A study on walnuts bears this claim out. Walnuts, it turns out, are good for sperm and for male fertility. . . .

Several studies have shown that ginger is effective for dysmenorrhoea, or painful period (Arch Gynecol Obstet 2015;291:1277-81; J Altern Complement Med 2009 Feb;15:129-32).

Now a new systematic review and meta-analysis has added to the evidence. . . .

Tylenol increases risk of death and serious side effects

We have written a lot on the ineffectiveness and serious side effects of painkillers: both NSAIDs and Acetaminophen containing drugs like Tylenol. We have talked about acetaminophen actually being the leading cause of acute liver failure. Emotionally, we have talked about its strange dulling effect upon the emotions, and we have talked about its dangers for pregnant women.

Comprehensive research, however, points to other alarming risks with using Tylenol. . . .

Recently, we wrote about telomeres and the science of anti-aging. We explained that he leading theory of aging is the telomere shortening theory. Telomeres (Greek for the part at the end) are protective DNA and protein complexes that cap the end of chromosomes and help them to remain stable. But each time a cell replicates, the telomere gets shorter until the cell finally dies. So, telomeres are like shortening timelines that measure cellular age. Free radical damage also shortens telomeres. Telomere shortening weakens proper replication of DNA, which results in cellular aging. Telomere shortness is a marker of aging, disease and premature death. So, preserving the length of your telomeres is the key to longevity.

In that blog, we looked at the science of vitamin D and protecting against aging by preserving telomere length. In this blog, we’ll look at exercise and preserving telomeres. . . .

Dwarf elder (Sambucus ebulus) is a relative of the more common elder (Sambucus nigra) that is used in the treatment of cold and flu. According to Maud Grieve’s A Modern Herbal, it differs from the better known elder in that it does not have a hard stem and dies back to the ground every year, making it, truly, a herb. She says that its old name, Danewort, comes from the antique belief that it sprang from the blood of Danes slain in battle. That’s the old belief. The new belief is not that it comes from pain, but that it cures pain. Modern research is showing that, when used topically, dwarf elder is better than drugs for treating osteoarthritits. . . .

Several studies have suggested that drinking pomegranate juice can lower your blood pressure. And at least one small, unblinded study has suggested that pomegranate juice can reverse  the progression of atherosclerosis while it lowers systolic blood pressure.

So, researchers decided to put all the controlled studies together in a systematic review and meta-analysis to determine whether simply drinking pomegranate juice can help blood pressure. . . .

fruit and vegetables protect against cognitive impairment and dementia

There have long been studies showing that eating more fruit and vegetables is good for improving brain function in the elderly (Arch Neurol 2009;66:216-25; Curr Opin Clin Metab Care 2010; 13:14-18). A previous review found that the association is positive, but more so for vegetables than fruit (J Nutr Health Aging 2012;16:626–630). The purpose of this new meta-analysis was to put all the research together to see how strong the evidence is. . . .

A stroke is a sudden loss of brain function caused by the interruption of blood flow to the brain or by the rupture of blood vessels in the brain. When the stroke is caused by a block of blood flow, it is called an ischemic stroke. Ischemic strokes are the most common form of stroke. The stroke starves the brain of blood and oxygen, and the brain cells begin to die. Stroke is the third leading cause of death in Canada, accounting for 6% of all deaths. In the United States, stroke accounts for 5.3% of all deaths.

About a quarter of all people who suffer ischemic strokes suffer cognitive impairment as a result of the stroke. Interestingly, according to the authors of this study, standard therapy is a natural therapy: folic acid.

This study shows that gotu kola is also an effective therapy. . . .

Every day we learn that common drugs we assumed to be safe aren’t. The latest casualty of the science of safety are the proton pump inhibitors frequently prescribed for heartburn as well as for ulcers. A new study now warns that they can lead to long-term kidney disease. . . .

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