Familial Adenomatous Polyposis (FAP) is a genetic disease that causes benign tumours in the colon. Although they are benign, if left untreated they can lead to colorectal cancer. This study looked at the effect of milk thistle and flax seeds on people with FAP. . . . 

Presumably, the entire rationale for creating diet soft drinks is that they are better for weight loss diets than regular soft drinks; hence, the name. But new research seems to discredit this rational and remove the justification for marketing diet soft drinks. . . .

Lycopene is an antioxidant in the carotene family that is, perhaps, best known for fighting prostate cancer. But new research suggests that it may be of value in preventing kidney cancer too. . . .

The research arm of the World Health Organization has declared the key ingredient in the herbicide Roundup a carcinogen. . . . 

Stress is associated with getting the flu or a cold. So researchers conducted a double-blind study to see if probiotics could prevent people under stress from getting a cold or flu . . . .

A new study set out to see which diet is the best for preventing colorectal cancer. The researchers divided 77,659 people into five dietary groups and followed them for about seven years. . . .

folic acid prevents strokes

Folic acid is a very important vitamin for a number of reasons. One of them is that it is probably the most important nutrient for controlling homocysteine, a dangerous compound that is linked to atherosclerosis. In what is being hailed by experts as an important study, folic acid has now been shown to benefit heart health. . . .

Brand new research analyzed the dietary patterns of 451,256 healthy people between the ages of 35 and 70 and followed them for 12.8 years. They scored higher on the plant based dietary pattern if they ate more vegetables, fruit, beans, grains, potato, nuts and olive oil; they scored lower on the plant based dietary pattern if they ate more meat, animal fats, eggs, fish or other seafood and dairy. . . .

This double-blind, placebo-controlled study gave either 5 grams of spirulina or a placebo each day for three months to 58 HIV-positive women from Cameroon who were not receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). . . .

A study conducted in Newfoundland and Labrador set out to see if there was any association between colon and rectal cancer and certain dietary patterns. . . .

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