A recent meta-analysis of studies on dietary fat and heart disease (Ann Intern Med 2014;160:398-406) caused huge excitement in the media which reported it as showing that the conventional guideline to decrease saturated fat and increase polyunaturated fat has been debunked.

But, not only did the media get the study wrong, more importantly, the study got it wrong. . . .

The latest study on natural health and schizophrenia adds the herb Ginkgo biloba to the list of supplements that can help. . . .

Watch Linda talk about her new book, The All-New Vegetarian Passport, on Daytime Toronto on Rogers TV on Thursday, February 13 at 10:00.

This new study accomplishes two important things: it adds more evidence that vitamin C helps fight cancer, and it adds more evidence that antioxidants help chemotherapy rather than interfering with it. . . . 

Recent research presented at a conference of the American Association for Cancer Research has found that men who have higher levels of melatonin have a significant 75% reduced risk of developing advanced prostate cancer than men who have lower levels. . . .

The Mediterranean diet has been shown to have a number of health benefits, especially for the heart. But past studies have also found that it can help prevent Alzheimer's disease. One study found an incredible 40-48% reduction in the risk of Alzheimer's (Am J Clin Nutr 2003).

So researchers did a review of five studies of more than 7,000 people sixty-five or older. . . .

See Linda on Breakfast Television on CITY this Thursday at 6:20am. Breakfast Television will be featuring Linda and her new book, The All-New Vegetarian Passport.

See Ted at Passport for Change this Sunday at Artscape Wychwood Barns at 601 Christied Street in Toronto. Ted will be speaking at Passport for Change on the lastest science of diet and nutrition.

Many risk factors, like high blood pressure, cholesterol problems, obesity and insulin resistance, are linked. Many of them are hallmarks of metabolic syndrome. Researchers conducted a double-blind, placebo-controlled study to determine the effect of green tea extract on many of these risk factors. . . .

We are always being told by doctors, nutritionists and the media that drinking milk is good for your bones. That milk is good for bones is perhaps the most commonly accepted piece of nutritional advice. But it's not true. . . .

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