The Canadian news has been full of the story that Hypertension Canada's education task force's most recent annual review has recommended raising the acceptable level of sodium from 1,500mg to 2,000mg. Most people consume an average of 3,400mg of salt a day, so, either way, the recommendation is to reduce salt intake.

Reducing salt is important if you have high blood pressure. Salt increases blood pressure. Cultures that do not add salt to their food have virtually no high blood pressure.

But what the news reports did not tell the public is that . . .

People suffering from multiple sclerosis often experience fatigue. So this double-blind, placebo-controled study looked at whether Korean red ginseng--a herb associated with energy--could help. . . .

A literature review conducted by the economic firm Frost &Sullivan has determined that dietary supplements can significantly reduce health care costs. . . .

This placebo-controlled study gave sixty healthy people 300-600mg of bacopa extract. The average age was 62.6 years. At the end of the twelve week study, the herb had enhanced attention, cognitive processing and working memory. . . .

A new report by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) warns that drug resistant super bugs have become an urgent public health concern. . . .

124 women with PMS were given either a placebo or an omega-3 fatty acid supplement supplying 240mg of DHA and 360mg of EPA for ninety days. . . . 

H. Pylori is a bacteria that is known to increase the risk of ulcers and stomach cancer. 

This double-blind study gave either 150mg of a standardized licorice root extract or a placebo to 107 people who tested positive for H. Pylori. . . .

There are three forms of vitamin K: K1 is the natural form found in plant food, K2 is made by bacteria in the gut; K3 is the synthetic form. K1 is know to improve bone mineral density in postmenopausal women, as are some forms of K2. This study looked at another form of K2. . . .

Eating lots of foods rich in flavonoid antioxidants has been shown to have many health benefits. A recent meta-analysis has added even more weight to the evidence that flavonoids are good for diabetes.

This huge study followed 33,713 women for over eleven years. It found that the women who get the most antioxidants in their diet are only about half as likely to suffer from heart failure than women who get the least (2% versus 3.9%). . . .

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