fiber lowers risk of heart disease, stroke, cancer and diabetes

Does eating more fiber really help you to be healthier? The definitive answer is now in. And the answer is . . .

This huge systematic review and meta-analysis commissioned by the World Health Organization looked at the studies that have been done on eating carbohydrates right up to the present. It included 185 prospective studies and 58 clinical studies of 4,635 people.

The study found that compared to people who eat the least fiber, people who eat the most have a 15-30% decrease in cardiovascular related deaths, in incidence of coronary heart disease, in incidence of and death from stroke, in type 2 diabetes and in colorectal cancer as well as in deaths from any cause during the studies.

People who eat more fiber have significantly lower bodyweight, systolic blood pressure and total cholesterol.

The best health results were found for people who get between 25g and 29g of fiber in their diet each day. The researchers found that even greater amounts of fiber could confer even greater benefit for cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes and colorectal and breast cancer.

Similar results were found when the researchers looked at whole grains.

Based on the results, the researchers say that we should increase our intake of fiber and replace refined grains with whole grains.

Lancet 2019;393(10170):434-5


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For tons of delicious ways to get more fiber in your diet, see Linda's book, The All-New Vegetarian Passport: a comprehensive health book and cookbook all in one.

 

The Natural Path is intended for educational purposes only and is in no way intended for self-diagnosis or self-treatment. For health problems, consult a qualified health practitioner for a comprehensive program.

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