fruit and vegetables protect against cognitive impairment and dementia

There have long been studies showing that eating more fruit and vegetables is good for improving brain function in the elderly (Arch Neurol 2009;66:216-25; Curr Opin Clin Metab Care 2010; 13:14-18). A previous review found that the association is positive, but more so for vegetables than fruit (J Nutr Health Aging 2012;16:626–630). The purpose of this new meta-analysis was to put all the research together to see how strong the evidence is. . . .

A stroke is a sudden loss of brain function caused by the interruption of blood flow to the brain or by the rupture of blood vessels in the brain. When the stroke is caused by a block of blood flow, it is called an ischemic stroke. Ischemic strokes are the most common form of stroke. The stroke starves the brain of blood and oxygen, and the brain cells begin to die. Stroke is the third leading cause of death in Canada, accounting for 6% of all deaths. In the United States, stroke accounts for 5.3% of all deaths.

About a quarter of all people who suffer ischemic strokes suffer cognitive impairment as a result of the stroke. Interestingly, according to the authors of this study, standard therapy is a natural therapy: folic acid.

This study shows that gotu kola is also an effective therapy. . . .

Every day we learn that common drugs we assumed to be safe aren’t. The latest casualty of the science of safety are the proton pump inhibitors frequently prescribed for heartburn as well as for ulcers. A new study now warns that they can lead to long-term kidney disease. . . .

In T.H. White's famous telling of the Arthurian legend, The Once and Future King, the wizard Merlin, after aging forward for half his life, begins to age backward again. Science may have discovered the Merlin Effect.

The leading theory of aging is the telomere shortening theory. Telomeres (Greek for the part at the end) are protective DNA and protein complexes that cap the end of chromosomes and help them to remain stable. But each time a cell replicates, the telomere gets shorter until the cell finally dies. So, telomeres are like shortening timelines that measure cellular age. Free radical damage also shortens telomeres. Telomere shortening weakens proper replication of DNA, which results in cellular aging. Telomere shortness is a marker of aging, disease and premature death. So, preserving the length of your telomeres is the key to longevity.

A new study adds to the already substantial evidence that vitamin D preserves telomere length and, so, could protect against aging. . . .

Ulcers are a very common and painful problem. New research suggests that curcumin, the active ingredient in turmeric, can help with the problem. The list of uses of curcumin keeps getting bigger. . . .

Resveratrol is a compound found in dark chocolate, peanuts, red grapes and raspberries. A new study has suggested that resveratrol can help slow the progression of Alzheimer’s disease. . . .

Chemotherapy causes mouth sores (stomatitis) in about 40% of people. Inflammation causes a painful or dry mouth, mouth sores, burning, peeling or swelling of the tongue. These sores are painful and can make it difficult to eat: an especially serious problem, since people on chemo already suffer loss of appetite and, frequently, weight loss and wasting.

A new study suggests that aloe vera might help. . . .

Got a cold or flu? Then look at this this shocking new study before you take an aspirin or other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID). . . .

Never heard of Dracocephalum extract? Neither have we. But Iran just released it as “the world’s first herbal medicine” for Alzheimer’s disease. . . .

The hallmark of CBC’s investigative journalism programs Fifth Estate and Marketplace and other CBC reporting’s long history of hostile reporting on natural health has been the one sided reporting that cherry picks their interviews and evidence.

Examples from the recent past include irresponsible, misleading and often unreferenced claims about Vitamin C, about natural supplements being ineffective, about the danger of supplements, about the safety of vitamins, about probiotics and weight loss, and being forced to retract a mistaken story on natural health products that didn’t contain what their labels promised.

The latest is Marketplace’s reporting on the efficacy and safety of green tea extract. . . .

 

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